All posts tagged: addiction treatment

Myanmar to receive over $3 Million to Battle Opium Addiction and Production

Myanmar is still the world’s second leading producer of opium after Afghanistan, and heroin and opium addiction are rampant within the village communities who rely on opium production for their livelihood. Despite eradication efforts, the United Nations reports that opium production has stabilized at high levels for a third year. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report, Myanmar produced an estimated 647 tons of opium in 2015. In Myanmar, mostly in poor mountainous border regions, there are approximately 55,000 hectares (212 sq miles) of land being used for opium poppy cultivation. In neighbouring Laos opium cultivation has also stabilized at only a tenth of the area in Myanmar with 5,700 hectares of opium fields, and only a few hundred hectares are left in Thailand. These three countries’ shared border makes up the infamous Golden Triangle and the area produces a quarter of the world’s opium. Jeremey Douglas, the UNODC’s chief in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, warned against calling the stabilization a “success”. The challenges and problems created by opium …

After Her Daughter’s Death, One Grieving Mother Wants to see a Change in Addiction Treatment and Education

Described by her mother as vibrant, witty and loving, Laura Mulley was not your ‘typical’ addict. Laura held down a respectable job at the University of California and enjoyed many hobbies in her spare time including writing, photography, and playing music. Just one week before Laura’s death which was caused by a lethal combination of drugs and alcohol, Laura’s mother, Linda, spent the weekend with her and noticed no visible signs of drug use or addiction. On the outside, Laura was living a good life, and according to her mother, Laura was excited about the direction that her life her was taking. It was not until after Laura’s death that Linda learned to what degree Laura was using drugs and alcohol. Laura fell into a pattern of using and quitting, using and quitting, (repeat) which can be just as harmful to one’s health as using on a daily or constant basis. But at the same time, the alcohol or drug addiction is less obvious to those on the outside – especially if they were to …

betel-nut

Myanmar’s Deadly Addiction to Betel Nuts

Teeth are stained a dark red colour, and cancer is on the rise in Myanmar. The culprit? The chewing of betel parcels – a leaf wrapped around a mass of betel nut. Know in the area as kun ja, these little parcels are a popular stimulant for Myanmar’s population. Especially, it would seem, for those who work in industries which require long work days. Users claim that it increases energy, alertness and even delivers fresher breath. However, the negative sides are quite high. For more information on this deadly addiction, read the full article on CNN here: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/04/world/asia/myanmar-betel-nut-cancer/

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‘Digital Detox’ Centres Open in Japan for 500,000 Teens Addicted to the Internet

Internet addiction is a type of process addiction that is becoming increasingly common among youth. With internet access always available, regular internet use goes too far when users begin losing sleep, dropping grades at school, or even getting demoted or fired in the workplace because internet use has become more important than other aspects of life. In Japan, internet addiction is soaring with an estimated 500,000 teenagers presumably addicted to the net. From playing games, to interacting in online chat rooms or simply scrolling through Facebook, these activities can create negative effects when taken too far. Teens are dropping out of school, and in worst case scenarios internet addiction can result in violence and even death. Will this ‘digital detox’ centre be able to combat the growing problem? Find out more here: Japan Tries Online Detox

After Addiction Treatment: For One Traveller, The World of Sober Experiences

  The most thrilling part of travelling is trying new things; be it tasting a local dish, or wrapping your mind around a baffling language, being a traveller is about seeking the space beyond your comfort zone. Often, travelling is also about letting loose, and reaching beyond your daily routine to use alcohol and drugs. But what about if you’ve completed addiction treatment? Is it still possible to see new places while remaining comfortable in your sobriety? In a recent essay published on The Fix entitled “The Trials of a Sober Backpacker,” one recovering addict writes about travelling alone through Southeast Asia, and of being confronted with the problem of wanting to accept the drink offered to her by her local hosts, but knowing that a sip of alcohol could mean closing the door on years of alcohol recovery. “I looked around for help,” Caledonia Dawson writes. “The few tables decorated with Christmas lights in the courtyard of a private home in the coastal town of Kep were empty, except for me and the two …

From Substance Abuse Rehab to the Stage

Substance abuse can lay waste to the human body. From rapid aging, to hair loss, to extreme weight loss, drugs physically weaken the body, not to mention the mind. Substance abuse rehab can reverse this decay. It is the beginning of gaining control over the body, and working towards a healthier physical and mental life. In a recent article on CNN.com, Joe Putignano talks about his success as a young gymnast, and how this was all taken away by his abuse of various substances, and his eventual addiction to heroin. He started using drugs at 17, and didn’t stop until he was 29. So, when Putignano fought back against his substance abuse, and the two overdoses that nearly took his life, and worked his way to a career as a performer with Cirque du Soleil’s show “Totem,” his fight was not just physical, but it was also a mental and spiritual climb. “I loved gymnastics more than anything I had ever known and it had become my church,” Putignano tells CNN.com. “I couldn’t believe I used …

Studying The Effects of Drugs on the Brain: A Possible Route to Drug Recovery?

Recently, The Guardian has been the host of a conversation between scientists and the British government. The talk concerns researchers’ rights to study the effects of psychodelic drugs on the human brain. Why do scientists want so desperately to do this, and why is the government making it so difficult to do so? The foremost objective of studying the brain while on illicit drugs is to understand it: to better comprehend how exactly drugs alter the brain’s chemistry. More evidence-based knowledge could be useful outside of the laboratory: it could be used to treat mental illness and to inform drug rehab programmes and other treatments for drug and alcohol users. The British government stands in the way. Because of drug categorisation, described as arbitrary, illicit drugs such as LSD and cannabis are extremely difficult to use as subjects in a human study. There are expensive licences that scientists must procure, in addition to the negative stigma that could fall upon a lab that chooses to study ‘party drugs.’ In the 1950s and 60s, the laws …

The Guardian’s Roundup of Worldwide 2012 Drug Use and Looking Ahead for Addiction Treatment

As part of a ‘year in review’ represented by data collected by the publication’s journalists, The Guardian recently released a short video detailing statistics around drug use in the U.K. and the U.S. Although the video doesn’t mention anything about addiction treatment, it certainly sets a focus for substance abuse rehab in the coming new year. It’s an excellent idea to begin reform with facts, no matter how difficult they may be to stomach, so that any new resolutions for addiction treatment address users—like those represented in The Guardian’s roundup—who might benefit from them the most. The results of the survey, which was completed by 15,500 people (most of them from the U.K. and the U.S.), represent a small portion of the substance abusing demographic. But despite how limited the pool may be, the findings are at both times, startling and unsurprising. Read more…

Drug Rehab: Findings from the 2012 World Drug Report

Image taken from The Guardian Earlier this year, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime published the World Drug Report 2012, with findings for the year 2010. The document is lengthy—just over 100 pages—and wordy, though there are several graphs that display the data clearly. The document is comprised of two sections. The first section is driven by figures and analyzes illicit drug markets, including which drugs are seeing an increase in markets, and where these markets are; the second half of the report is concerned with social trends, including the demographics of users and a forecast of global drug use. In the hopes of making this information clearer and more relevant, I’ve extracted from the report significant ideas as they relate to drug rehab. Who Is Receiving Drug Addiction Treatment? According to the UNODC, about 20% of drug users received treatment in 2010. The report does not break down this number by geographic region, but it finds that users sought drug rehab for opioid abuse—in most cases, heroin—more often than any other drug. …